Kim Kardashian West faced recent controversy over some paid-for content on her Instagram feed. 

She was photographed posing coquettishly with a lollipop in her mouth from manufacturers The Flat Tummy Co lollipops.

It was claimed that the lollipop can be used as an appetite suppressant due to it containing Satiereal, a saffron extract which supposedly activates a neurotransmitter that combats the urge to overeat.

Only a limited scientific study has been undertaken of Satiereal’s effectiveness for weight loss even though it is a growing favourite ingredient in weight loss products.

It involved a mere sixty 60 'healthy, mildly overweight women'—half of whom took a twice-daily capsule of Satiereal, while the others received a placebo.

The study found over a two month period than 99 per cent of the women in the Satiereal group had 'significantly greater body weight reduction' than those in the placebo group.

That study was considered favourable enough to be the foundation on which Kim Kardashian West's Flat Tummy Co. created its range of supposedly appetite busting products. 



Appetite suppressants have had a chequered history as an aid to weight-loss.

Fashion-conscious 'It' girls in the 1960s swore by smoking as an effective way to reduce their appetite. If they felt hungry, they would light a cigarette instead of eating. Early cigarette advertising targeted women’s desire to stay slim by launching specially created cigarettes for the female market.

By the late 60s tobacco giant Philip Morris had launched a brand called Virginia Slims, so named to play on the belief that smoking helped you slim.

Urban legends say zero-size catwalk models who face a constant battle to achieve the tiny body measurements their industry’ demands often suppress their appetite from eating calorie-free cotton wool balls which swell in their stomach to make them feel full or eat only one sliced apple a day.

You can read the fascinating memoir of a catwalk model in Victoire Dauxerre’s book entitled ‘Size Zero: My Life as a Disappearing Model’ Click to buy it here from Amazon.

Another popular appetite suppressant was marketed with the brand name Ayds (pronounced ‘aids.") It was an appetite-suppressant toffee-style candy launched in the late-1970s and early 1980s.

By the mid-80s, as public awareness of the disease AIDS increased it caused problems for the brand due to the phonetic similarity of names. It was eventually withdrawn from the market.

The search for the holy grail of effortlessly eating less continues right up to date with tens of brands of exotic teas promising to curb appetite or to provide an effective detox. It would seem that none of them currently stand up to scientific scrutiny.

In the work Liz and I do with our weight loss clients we find the best way to suppress your appetite at lunchtime is to have had a hearty protein based breakfast; and the best way to not over-eat at dinner-time is a have eaten a protein-rich and satisfying lunch.

So much disordered eating is hidden in plain sight as it takes place in secret in a person's subconscious mind. If you are vulnerable to disordered eating, or someone who has experienced an eating disorder in the past, the purchasing of appetite suppressants can be a way to legitimise your unhealthy eating patterns. It can also be used as an excuse to obscure what is really happening with yourself and food.

It has been shown that your body will continually crave nourishment until you provide it with a balanced and healthy way to eat. Your body will also hold on to every last gram of fat it has if you are constantly yo-yo dieting and restricting your calories which replicates the effects of famine.

If you know your eating is either out of control or absorbing far too much of your thoughts then you might be ready to explore what is really happening with you and food.

You can erase your secret feelings of shame and transform your relationship with food so that you can eat for nourishment instead. If you recognise yourself here you can book an obligation free call with me via this page.

Are You An Emotional Eater?

Find Out Free In Our Quiz

If you want to lead a happier more fulfilled life it’s almost impossible when you’re doubting yourself or sabotaging your chances of success. Therapy isn’t for everyone, but if you’ve ‘tried everything’ it could be just what you need. You can book an obligation-free 30-minute discovery call to find out for yourself.

 

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